The Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center works with natural and cultural resource managers in the Northeast and Midwest regions to apply future climate scenarios to decision making and co-produce information, and tools for climate change adaptation.

 

UMass Amherst Master's student Keenan Yakola has been working to understand the impacts climate change will have on nesting seabirds in the Gulf of Maine.  He recently was awarded Best Student Paper at the Pacific Seabird Group annual meeting.

Photo: Earl Johnson

NE CASC Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellows assembled in the north woods of New Hampshire to learn about climate science, co-production and building multi-disciplinary research relationships.

The Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (note our new name!) is proud to present its 2017 annual report.  Recent projects, events, research activities, and Fellow’s work are highlighted.  

NE CASC Postdoctoral Research Fellow Madeline Magee studies how Wisconsin lakes are changing under the effects of climate change and land use. After receiving her Ph.D in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Wisconsin Madison, she continued her works as a postdoctoral research...

NE CSC's Regional Science Meeting:  Incorporating Climate Science in the Management of Natural and Cultural Resources in the Midwest and Northeast took place May 15-17, 2017 on the UMass Amherst Campus.    Click READ MORE for the proceedings. 

Photo: Toni Klemm

Katie Booras is a Northeast Climate Science Center graduate fellow who recieved a Master’s in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.  Her work focuses directly on managing water resources for a changing climate.

Take a trip with Paul and his team into the field!  We’ve updated our highlight of Paul with a neat video that paints a picture of one aspect of his Ph.D. investigation into how brook trout are affected by and adapt to climate change.  

Photo: Andy Castillo

This recent Fellow with the Northeast Climate Science Center does a lot of work behind the scenes, but his research on salt marshes is vital to many systems, from the scallops in a Florida bay, to important decision-making agencies on Long Island. 

NE CASC Graduate Fellow Pearl May works with a team at the University of Wisconsin to help Dane County, WI officials understand the potential flooding risks in the area.  Their storm transposition tool assesses the potential impacts of a known storm transposed on a different location - in this case the city and infrastructure of Madison, Wisconsin.

Photo: Dana O'Shea

The 2015 NE CSC Fellows Retreat was held September 22-25 in Suring, Wisconsin. Twenty Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellows gathered to share their research, develop collaborations, and learn from stakeholders and scientists who have established strong working relationships.

Photo: Thomas Bonnot, NE CSC Graduate Fellow

The NE CASC’s Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellows are actively engaged in research that provides scientific information and tools that natural resource managers can use to aid climate adaptation in the Northeast region.  What are they working on and who will benefit from their research?  Watch the video!

NE CSC Fellow David Johnson was standing in a salt marsh on the northern Massachusetts coast when he saw a fiddler crab, Uca pugnax, nearly 50 miles north of its supposed natural range. The migration north of this charismatic crab with the big, waving claw may be yet another sign of climate change.

Photo: David Johnson

NE CASC News

NE CASC e-Newsletters

Save the Dates: NE CASC Regional Science Symposium

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

NE CASC invites the climate adaptation science community to participate in our 2021 Regional Science Symposium, which will take place online on Tuesday, October 26th, and Wednesday, October 27th. Please mark your calendars for this exciting event!

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NE CASC Statement on Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Justice

Friday, April 9, 2021

Over much of the past year, NE CASC has engaged in a wide-ranging discussion to determine how we can best help create a more diverse, equitable, inclusive, and just community of scholars, practitioners and stakeholders. This reflection has resulted in a variety of actions to advance our goal. Most recently, we have articulated our vision in a statement that we are now pleased to share publicly.

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RISCC Management Challenge: Forest Pest Risk Is Heating Up

Thursday, April 8, 2021
Gypsy Moth

Insect pests and climate change constitute significant separate threats to forest health. But their combined impact is even greater. In this new handout, RISCC researchers identify several key strategies for managing challenges posed by the convergence of these dangers to many tree species.

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New Publication: Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability of Aquatic-Riparian Ecosystems Using Decision-Relevant Indicators

Monday, March 29, 2021
The eight-state area investigated by Delaney and Bouska along with the area's corresponding Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC)-8 watersheds.

A team led by John Delaney and Kristen Bouska recently completed a study, "Mapping climate change vulnerability of aquatic-riparian ecosystems using decision-relevant indicators,"  which has been published in the journal Ecological Indicators

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New Publication: Survival and Growth of Planted Replacement Tree Species in Black Ash (Fraxinus nigra) Wetlands Threatened by Emerald Ash Borer

Wednesday, March 17, 2021
Black Ash Ravaged by the Emerald Ash Borer

How can the resilience of black ash forests, which serve a central role in the cultural lifeways and traditions of Indigenous peoples, be increased in the face of the threat posed by emerald ash borer? A team of scientists and managers led by NE CASC principal investigator Anthony D'Amato explored this question via a large-scale experiment in Minnesota's Chippewa National Forest. Their results were recently published in Forest Ecology and Management.

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2020 NE CASC Annual Report

Friday, February 12, 2021
Marbled Salamander

NE CASC is pleased to share our 2020 Annual Report, which documents many of our accomplishments over the past year by summarizing our recent research, outreach, and educational activities. 

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New Publication: Sediment Supply and Potential Impacts of Dam Removals

Thursday, February 11, 2021
Sediment Trap

A new study by NE CASC researchers Brian Yellen and Jon Woodruff reveals that man-made dams built in the Lower Hudson watershed do not trap as much sediment from riverways as previously believed. These findings are particularly important for the many Hudson River communities seeking to remove existing man-made dams that are no longer needed for industrial use and may negatively impact wetlands or interfere with local river restoration efforts.

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Environmental & Water Engineering Spring Seminar Series

Monday, February 8, 2021

NE CASC University Director Richard Palmer has organized a Spring Environmental & Water Resources Engineering webinar Series for Spring Semester 2021. All members of the NE CASC community are enthusiastically invited to participate!

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