LCC News

Central Appalachians FLN Annual Workshop

Appalachian LCC News -

People came from across the network’s four landscapes in Kentucky, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia, as well as from North Carolina, South Carolina and Texas. Consistent with this year’s theme—Bridging the Gap: Managing the Ecological Needs and Social Perceptions of Fire in the Central Appalachians—discussions centered on the integrated management of controlled burns and wild res to meet ecological needs, and on social perceptions of re, including the need for improved public engagement to support further scaling- up restoration work.

The first day’s agenda was rich with varied content and interactive sessions. Lessons from the Rocky Mount wildfire in Shenandoah National Park were shared by a diverse panel that covered public engagement challenges and successes as well as planning and management strategies.

The interactive Talking Fire session gave participants guidelines for telling a good story—followed by small-group exercises for practicing messaging techniques. Jenifer Bunty of the Consortium of Appalachian Fire Managers and Scientists (CAFMS) also gave a presentation on the Fire Learning Trail in the Linville Gorge Wilderness. Signage along this enhanced interpretive trail is supplemented with entertaining podcasts in which local re practitioners introduce visitors to the role of re in the area.

“Flash presentations” on research high-lighted fire’s role in American chestnut restoration (Matthew Vaughn, Texas A&M), fire scar and charcoal records in a rare Appalachian pitch pine bog (Dr. Lisa Kennedy and Chance Raso, Virginia Tech) and a synthesis of research from the Fire in Eastern Oak Forests Conference (Helen Mohr, USFS/CAFMS).

During the Technology Café session, app guru Jason Hattersley (USFS) encouraged participants to pull out their smart phones and tablets to learn and practice tech- niques for distributing and using geo- referenced maps on hand-held devices. John Moncure (USFS) shared tips for making highly effective incident maps. Participants received a QR code link that downloaded Avenza maps to their phones, allowing for group participation during the indoor session—and practical application on the next day’s field trip.

Wrapping up the day, breakout sessions permitted small group dialog on building capacity for monitoring and future research needs. This time also provided space for the initial meeting of the new Grasslands Working Group.

Discussions of media and public engagement were carried into the field on the second day, as participants visited three sites with different themes to explore. One site had recently seen a wild fire in designated Wilderness; the next was a shortleaf pine restoration project with both prescribed burn and mechanical treatment components; and a third demonstrated the use of fire to promote rare and endemic species in Shenandoah Valley sinkhole ponds.

In closing, the annual Partnership Award was presented to Steve Croy, Ecologist and Fire Planner for George Washington and Jefferson National Forests. Steve was instrumental in planning the initial workshop of fire management partners across the Appalachians in 2006, which led to the formation of the Central Appalachians and Southern Blue Ridge regional FLNs. He has played a major role in planning and helping to fund fire history research across the region and spearheaded the application of spatial tools, models and mapping that has helped prioritize the FLN’s efforts to restore good fire on the landscape across agency boundaries. His tireless work on the ground also takes to the air: on any aerial ignition burn conducted over the past 10 years, Steve was probably in the helicopter or otherwise coordinating it.

Changes afoot for GCPO Geomatics Staff

Gulf Coastal Plains & Ozarks LCC News -

Just shy of three years ago, I took a bold leap and joined the GCPO LCC team as Geomatics Coordinator.  I can now say without a doubt that it was one of the best decisions of my life.  When I first introduced myself as LCC staff I said “I believe whole-heartedly in the partnership-based vision necessary to address landscape-scale ecological sustainability.”  That sentiment is even stronger today as we’ve made such tremendous progress working toward the first LCC conservation blueprint, and subsequently, the first iteration of the Southeastern Conservation Adaptation Strategy.   I echo what I said in 2014 – “it is an exciting time to work in the conservation field, a time that requires us to think smarter, more efficiently, and more strategically.” Just think about it…. over the last few years we as a conservation community have accomplished something that has never been done before at this scale.  We have come together with differing visions and missions across our partnership in an unprecedented effort to identify the network of lands and waters most important to us, most vulnerable to loss, and most critical to the conservation landscape – reflecting our core conservation values and priorities – to leave a conservation legacy for our grandchildren’s grandchildren.   Though we are far from done, I am personally so proud that I have had the opportunity to work with the visionaries who have brought us this far.  I’ve had many fond thoughts toward the future when someday I will reflect back on this time and will proudly say I was privileged enough to work side-by-side with these individuals.  It has been thrilling to be a part of this monumental effort, and our southern style conservation approach has afforded me countless warm relationships that I look forward to carrying on throughout my career.    

However, as it did nearly three years ago, good fortune has once again bestowed itself on me, though this time the decision was not an easy one to make (as many of my colleagues can attest to!).  After the first of the year, I will be transitioning from LCC Geomatics Coordinator to a new role as cooperative research liaison between the GCPO LCC and Mississippi State University.  At that time I will be transitioning to the MSU Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Aquaculture to take on a new position as Assistant Professor of Conservation Biology.  As conservation biology faculty I’ll have the opportunity to build a research program focused on sustaining biodiversity in the Southeastern U.S. and beyond, as well as prepare the next generation of conservationists through teaching and mentoring.  However, I will remain affiliated with the MSU Geosystems Research Institute and will continue my LCC duties managing the cooperative agreement with MSU, as well as participating in LCC science and geomatics endeavors.  I'm looking forward to this new challenge that awaits me, though I cannot express enough how much of a pleasure it has been serving our partnership in the Geomatics Coordinator role the past nearly 3 years.  I have so enjoyed helping to shape geospatial science activities of the LCC, and helping to deliver geospatial science via our Conservation Planning Atlas.  A sincere thank you goes to the amazing staff, steering committee, and long list of collaborators that comprise the LCC for welcoming me with open arms and for the continued support as I take on this new role.  We will be announcing our new LCC Geomatics Coordinator shortly after the New Year, and expect that individual to offer a seamless transition in geomatics activities. 

So I’m not really going to say goodbye, as I will still be around, though serving in a different capacity.  I guess I’ll just say that I wish you all a warm and happy holiday season, and I look forward to our continued collaboration next year!  And as I always say, don’t hesitate to contact me if you ever need anything!

Kristine

Changes afoot for GCPO Geomatics Staff

Gulf Coastal Plains & Ozarks LCC News -

Just shy of three years ago, I took a bold leap and joined the GCPO LCC team as Geomatics Coordinator.  I can now say without a doubt that it was one of the best decisions of my life.  When I first introduced myself as LCC staff I said “I believe whole-heartedly in the partnership-based vision necessary to address landscape-scale ecological sustainability.”  That sentiment is even stronger today as we’ve made such tremendous progress working toward the first LCC conservation blueprint, and subsequently, the first iteration of the Southeastern Conservation Adaptation Strategy.   I echo what I said in 2014 – “it is an exciting time to work in the conservation field, a time that requires us to think smarter, more efficiently, and more strategically.” Just think about it…. over the last few years we as a conservation community have accomplished something that has never been done before at this scale.  We have come together with differing visions and missions across our partnership in an unprecedented effort to identify the network of lands and waters most important to us, most vulnerable to loss, and most critical to the conservation landscape – reflecting our core conservation values and priorities – to leave a conservation legacy for our grandchildren’s grandchildren.   Though we are far from done, I am personally so proud that I have had the opportunity to work with the visionaries who have brought us this far.  I’ve had many fond thoughts toward the future when someday I will reflect back on this time and will proudly say I was privileged enough to work side-by-side with these individuals.  It has been thrilling to be a part of this monumental effort, and our southern style conservation approach has afforded me countless warm relationships that I look forward to carrying on throughout my career.    

However, as it did nearly three years ago, good fortune has once again bestowed itself on me, though this time the decision was not an easy one to make (as many of my colleagues can attest to!).  After the first of the year, I will be transitioning from LCC Geomatics Coordinator to a new role as cooperative research liaison between the GCPO LCC and Mississippi State University.  At that time I will be transitioning to the MSU Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Aquaculture to take on a new position as Assistant Professor of Conservation Biology.  As conservation biology faculty I’ll have the opportunity to build a research program focused on sustaining biodiversity in the Southeastern U.S. and beyond, as well as prepare the next generation of conservationists through teaching and mentoring.  However, I will remain affiliated with the MSU Geosystems Research Institute and will continue my LCC duties managing the cooperative agreement with MSU, as well as participating in LCC science and geomatics endeavors.  I'm looking forward to this new challenge that awaits me, though I cannot express enough how much of a pleasure it has been serving our partnership in the Geomatics Coordinator role the past nearly 3 years.  I have so enjoyed helping to shape geospatial science activities of the LCC, and helping to deliver geospatial science via our Conservation Planning Atlas.  A sincere thank you goes to the amazing staff, steering committee, and long list of collaborators that comprise the LCC for welcoming me with open arms and for the continued support as I take on this new role.  We will be announcing our new LCC Geomatics Coordinator shortly after the New Year, and expect that individual to offer a seamless transition in geomatics activities. 

So I’m not really going to say goodbye, as I will still be around, though serving in a different capacity.  I guess I’ll just say that I wish you all a warm and happy holiday season, and I look forward to our continued collaboration next year!  And as I always say, don’t hesitate to contact me if you ever need anything!

Kristine

Changes afoot for GCPO Geomatics Staff

Gulf Coastal Plains & Ozarks LCC News -

Just shy of three years ago, I took a bold leap and joined the GCPO LCC team as Geomatics Coordinator.  I can now say without a doubt that it was one of the best decisions of my life.  When I first introduced myself as LCC staff I said “I believe whole-heartedly in the partnership-based vision necessary to address landscape-scale ecological sustainability.”  That sentiment is even stronger today as we’ve made such tremendous progress working toward the first LCC conservation blueprint, and subsequently, the first iteration of the Southeastern Conservation Adaptation Strategy.   I echo what I said in 2014 – “it is an exciting time to work in the conservation field, a time that requires us to think smarter, more efficiently, and more strategically.” Just think about it…. over the last few years we as a conservation community have accomplished something that has never been done before at this scale.  We have come together with differing visions and missions across our partnership in an unprecedented effort to identify the network of lands and waters most important to us, most vulnerable to loss, and most critical to the conservation landscape – reflecting our core conservation values and priorities – to leave a conservation legacy for our grandchildren’s grandchildren.   Though we are far from done, I am personally so proud that I have had the opportunity to work with the visionaries who have brought us this far.  I’ve had many fond thoughts toward the future when someday I will reflect back on this time and will proudly say I was privileged enough to work side-by-side with these individuals.  It has been thrilling to be a part of this monumental effort, and our southern style conservation approach has afforded me countless warm relationships that I look forward to carrying on throughout my career.    

However, as it did nearly three years ago, good fortune has once again bestowed itself on me, though this time the decision was not an easy one to make (as many of my colleagues can attest to!).  After the first of the year, I will be transitioning from LCC Geomatics Coordinator to a new role as cooperative research liaison between the GCPO LCC and Mississippi State University.  At that time I will be transitioning to the MSU Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Aquaculture to take on a new position as Assistant Professor of Conservation Biology.  As conservation biology faculty I’ll have the opportunity to build a research program focused on sustaining biodiversity in the Southeastern U.S. and beyond, as well as prepare the next generation of conservationists through teaching and mentoring.  However, I will remain affiliated with the MSU Geosystems Research Institute and will continue my LCC duties managing the cooperative agreement with MSU, as well as participating in LCC science and geomatics endeavors.  I'm looking forward to this new challenge that awaits me, though I cannot express enough how much of a pleasure it has been serving our partnership in the Geomatics Coordinator role the past nearly 3 years.  I have so enjoyed helping to shape geospatial science activities of the LCC, and helping to deliver geospatial science via our Conservation Planning Atlas.  A sincere thank you goes to the amazing staff, steering committee, and long list of collaborators that comprise the LCC for welcoming me with open arms and for the continued support as I take on this new role.  We will be announcing our new LCC Geomatics Coordinator shortly after the New Year, and expect that individual to offer a seamless transition in geomatics activities. 

So I’m not really going to say goodbye, as I will still be around, though serving in a different capacity.  I guess I’ll just say that I wish you all a warm and happy holiday season, and I look forward to our continued collaboration next year!  And as I always say, don’t hesitate to contact me if you ever need anything!

Kristine

Changes afoot for GCPO Geomatics Staff

Gulf Coastal Plains & Ozarks LCC News -

Just shy of three years ago, I took a bold leap and joined the GCPO LCC team as Geomatics Coordinator.  I can now say without a doubt that it was one of the best decisions of my life.  When I first introduced myself as LCC staff I said “I believe whole-heartedly in the partnership-based vision necessary to address landscape-scale ecological sustainability.”  That sentiment is even stronger today as we’ve made such tremendous progress working toward the first LCC conservation blueprint, and subsequently, the first iteration of the Southeastern Conservation Adaptation Strategy.   I echo what I said in 2014 – “it is an exciting time to work in the conservation field, a time that requires us to think smarter, more efficiently, and more strategically.” Just think about it…. over the last few years we as a conservation community have accomplished something that has never been done before at this scale.  We have come together with differing visions and missions across our partnership in an unprecedented effort to identify the network and lands and waters most important to us, most vulnerable to loss, and most critical to the conservation landscape – reflecting our core conservation values and priorities – to leave a conservation legacy for our grandchildren’s grandchildren.   Though we are far from done, I am personally so proud that I have had the opportunity to work with the visionaries who have brought us this far.  I’ve had many fond thoughts toward the future when someday I will reflect back on this time and will proudly say I was privileged enough to work side-by-side with these individuals.  It has been thrilling to be a part of this monumental effort, and our southern style conservation approach has afforded me countless warm relationships that I look forward to carrying on throughout my career.    

However, as it did nearly three years ago, good fortune has once again bestowed itself on me, though this time the decision was not an easy one to make (as many of my colleagues can attest to!).  After the first of the year, I will be transitioning from LCC Geomatics Coordinator to a new role as cooperative research liaison between the GCPO LCC and Mississippi State University.  At that time I will be transitioning to the MSU Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Aquaculture to take on a new position as Assistant Professor of Conservation Biology.  As conservation biology faculty I’ll have the opportunity to build a research program focused on sustaining biodiversity in the Southeastern U.S. and beyond, as well as prepare the next generation of conservationists through teaching and mentoring.  However, I will remain affiliated with the MSU Geosystems Research Institute and will continue my LCC duties managing the cooperative agreement with MSU, as well as participating in LCC science and geomatics endeavors.  I'm looking forward to this new challenge that awaits me, though I cannot express enough how much of a pleasure it has been serving our partnership in the Geomatics Coordinator role the past nearly 3 years.  I have so enjoyed helping to shape geospatial science activities of the LCC, and helping to deliver geospatial science via our Conservation Planning Atlas.  A sincere thank you goes to the amazing staff, steering committee, and long list of collaborators that comprise the LCC for welcoming me with open arms and for the continued support as I take on this new role.  We will be announcing our new LCC Geomatics Coordinator shortly after the New Year, and expect that individual to offer a seamless transition in geomatics activities. 

So I’m not really going to say goodbye, as I will still be around, though serving in a different capacity.  I guess I’ll just say that I wish you all a warm and happy holiday season, and I look forward to our continued collaboration next year!  And as I always say, don’t hesitate to contact me if you ever need anything!

Kristine

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