Gulf Coastal Plains & Ozarks LCC News

If not for the GCPO LCC, ............

“In baseball, you don’t know nothing.” - Yogi Berra If you haven’t heard the news, LCC’s are targeted for elimination in the Trump Administration’s FY18 federal budget, which was submitted to Congress a few weeks ago, and would (theoretically) begin October 1, 2017. From a federal budgeting perspective, it’s like the opening pitch in a 9-inning baseball game, and Congress is up to bat next. Ultimately, Congress has the responsibility of passing a federal budget and submitting it to the President for his signature.

Curve Balls and the Long Arc of U.S. Conservation History

"This country has gotten where it is in spite of politics, not by the aid of it. That we have carried as much political bunk as we have and still survived shows we are a super nation." - Will Rogers (1932) Well, the world of conservation was certainly thrown a curve ball on November 8, 2016. The election of Donald J. Trump as the 45th President of the United States was unexpected by many people. For those of us in the conservation profession, it raises many questions on what the new President-elect’s priorities will be for our country.

More New Data Galleries on the Conservation Planning Atlas

If you somehow missed the more-than-100-dataset Blueprint gallery in Todd’s blog, check it out here. Murrow’s black bear habitat model for AR and LA is up . The upland hardwood assessment gallery (part of the Blueprint) also has some new data layers . The Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative (NGOM SSC) is a partnership focused on sea-level rise and inundation in the northern Gulf of Mexico.  The NGOM SSC gallery contains the Surface Elevation Table (SET) inventory and a new dataset of “continuously operating reference stations” (CORS) for the northern Gulf .

Changes afoot for GCPO Geomatics Staff

Just shy of three years ago, I took a bold leap and joined the GCPO LCC team as Geomatics Coordinator.  I can now say without a doubt that it was one of the best decisions of my life.  When I first introduced myself as LCC staff I said “I believe whole-heartedly in the partnership-based vision necessary to address landscape-scale ecological sustainability.”  That sentiment is even stronger today as we’ve made such tremendous progress working toward the first LCC conservation blueprint, and subsequently, the first iteration of the Southeastern Conservation Adaptation Strategy.

Draft Dataset of Known Prairie Patches in the GCPO available for review

Introduction: While never a dominant feature in the landscape, natural grassland systems once formed an ecologically cohesive and important “archipelago” or “shifting mosaic” of patches of open grasses and broad-leaved herbaceous flowering plants called forbs, usually on calcareous soils in belted formations, across much of the East and West Gulf Coastal Plains and, more rarely, in parts of the Ozark Highlands and Gulf Coast. About 99% of these landscapes have been converted to other land uses or have transitioned into forested conditions due to fire suppression and ecological succession.

Summer Vacations, and Landscapes Transformed

​ I went on Shore, & passed thro the plain passed Several noles to the top of a high artificial Noal from the top of this noal I had an emence , extensive & pleaseing prospect, of the Countrey around, I could See the meandering of the Little River for at least 10 miles winding thro  a meadow of 15 or 20000 acres of high bottom land covered with Grass about 4 1/ 2 feet high, the high lands which rose irregularly, & were toped with Mounds or antent Graves which is to me a Strong evidence of this Countrey haveing been thickly Settled.  Captain William Clark,  July 12, 1804 (excerpt from The Journ

Recalling the GCPO/GCP/GOMA Meetings in Baton Rouge, LA

A few takeaways from last month’s GCPO/GCP/GOMA joint meeting: The Tuesday joint sessions on the Gulf and Bottomland Hardwood systems were well-attended, and certainly showed a high level of interest in what’s going on with LCC-associated projects. For the Gulf session, it was an opportunity for us to highlight some of the research that LCCs have been involved with over the last several years, and which have recently come to a conclusion.

Plenty to ruminate on at the Mid-South Prairie Symposium

A couple of weeks ago I was able to attend the  Mid-South Prairie Symposium  at Austin Peay State University (APSU) in Clarksville, Tennessee. The symposium was organized by Dwayne Estes, professor of APSU’s Center of Excellence for Field Biology at APSU and botanical explorer for the Botanical Research Institute of Texas (BRIT). Dr. Estes’ research interests include biogeography, threatened and endangered species, and plant communities of Tennessee and neighboring states. Dr.

Creating a Shared Vision in the GCPO LCC

Few, if any, forces in human affairs are as powerful as shared vision.  Peter Senge   Next month, the GCPO and Gulf Coast Prairie LCCs will be convening in Baton Rouge, LA, to engage in Steering Committee discussions.  It’s our annual spring/summer retreat, where we really dig into the most important questions and issues facing the GCPO partnership, and I’m looking forward to getting together once again with our Steering Committee and other partners.  This year, we'll be meeting in conjunction with the Gulf of Mexico Alliance’s All-Hands Meeting, which will provide our Steering Committee an ex

If not for the GCPO LCC, ............

“In baseball, you don’t know nothing.” - Yogi Berra If you haven’t heard the news, LCC’s are targeted for elimination in the Trump Administration’s FY18 federal budget, which was submitted to Congress a few weeks ago, and would (theoretically) begin October 1, 2017. From a federal budgeting perspective, it’s like the opening pitch in a 9-inning baseball game, and Congress is up to bat next. Ultimately, Congress has the responsibility of passing a federal budget and submitting it to the President for his signature.

Curve Balls and the Long Arc of U.S. Conservation History

"This country has gotten where it is in spite of politics, not by the aid of it. That we have carried as much political bunk as we have and still survived shows we are a super nation." - Will Rogers (1932) Well, the world of conservation was certainly thrown a curve ball on November 8, 2016. The election of Donald J. Trump as the 45th President of the United States was unexpected by many people. For those of us in the conservation profession, it raises many questions on what the new President-elect’s priorities will be for our country.

More New Data Galleries on the Conservation Planning Atlas

If you somehow missed the more-than-100-dataset Blueprint gallery in Todd’s blog, check it out here. Murrow’s black bear habitat model for AR and LA is up . The upland hardwood assessment gallery (part of the Blueprint) also has some new data layers . The Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative (NGOM SSC) is a partnership focused on sea-level rise and inundation in the northern Gulf of Mexico.  The NGOM SSC gallery contains the Surface Elevation Table (SET) inventory and a new dataset of “continuously operating reference stations” (CORS) for the northern Gulf .

Changes afoot for GCPO Geomatics Staff

Just shy of three years ago, I took a bold leap and joined the GCPO LCC team as Geomatics Coordinator.  I can now say without a doubt that it was one of the best decisions of my life.  When I first introduced myself as LCC staff I said “I believe whole-heartedly in the partnership-based vision necessary to address landscape-scale ecological sustainability.”  That sentiment is even stronger today as we’ve made such tremendous progress working toward the first LCC conservation blueprint, and subsequently, the first iteration of the Southeastern Conservation Adaptation Strategy.

Draft Dataset of Known Prairie Patches in the GCPO available for review

Introduction: While never a dominant feature in the landscape, natural grassland systems once formed an ecologically cohesive and important “archipelago” or “shifting mosaic” of patches of open grasses and broad-leaved herbaceous flowering plants called forbs, usually on calcareous soils in belted formations, across much of the East and West Gulf Coastal Plains and, more rarely, in parts of the Ozark Highlands and Gulf Coast. About 99% of these landscapes have been converted to other land uses or have transitioned into forested conditions due to fire suppression and ecological succession.

Summer Vacations, and Landscapes Transformed

​ I went on Shore, & passed thro the plain passed Several noles to the top of a high artificial Noal from the top of this noal I had an emence , extensive & pleaseing prospect, of the Countrey around, I could See the meandering of the Little River for at least 10 miles winding thro  a meadow of 15 or 20000 acres of high bottom land covered with Grass about 4 1/ 2 feet high, the high lands which rose irregularly, & were toped with Mounds or antent Graves which is to me a Strong evidence of this Countrey haveing been thickly Settled.  Captain William Clark,  July 12, 1804 (excerpt from The Journ

Recalling the GCPO/GCP/GOMA Meetings in Baton Rouge, LA

A few takeaways from last month’s GCPO/GCP/GOMA joint meeting: The Tuesday joint sessions on the Gulf and Bottomland Hardwood systems were well-attended, and certainly showed a high level of interest in what’s going on with LCC-associated projects. For the Gulf session, it was an opportunity for us to highlight some of the research that LCCs have been involved with over the last several years, and which have recently come to a conclusion.

Plenty to ruminate on at the Mid-South Prairie Symposium

A couple of weeks ago I was able to attend the  Mid-South Prairie Symposium  at Austin Peay State University (APSU) in Clarksville, Tennessee. The symposium was organized by Dwayne Estes, professor of APSU’s Center of Excellence for Field Biology at APSU and botanical explorer for the Botanical Research Institute of Texas (BRIT). Dr. Estes’ research interests include biogeography, threatened and endangered species, and plant communities of Tennessee and neighboring states. Dr.

Creating a Shared Vision in the GCPO LCC

Few, if any, forces in human affairs are as powerful as shared vision.  Peter Senge   Next month, the GCPO and Gulf Coast Prairie LCCs will be convening in Baton Rouge, LA, to engage in Steering Committee discussions.  It’s our annual spring/summer retreat, where we really dig into the most important questions and issues facing the GCPO partnership, and I’m looking forward to getting together once again with our Steering Committee and other partners.  This year, we'll be meeting in conjunction with the Gulf of Mexico Alliance’s All-Hands Meeting, which will provide our Steering Committee an ex

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