Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Also collaborating on these NE CSC projects

Providing Support for the Development of a Tribal Forest Adaptation Menu

In early 2017 Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC) began work with the US Forest Service's Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science (NIACS) to develop a Tribally focused adaptation menu based on the "Forest Adaptation Resources: climate change tools and approaches for land managers" workbook. College of Menominee Nation Sustainable Development Institute (CMN SDI)will support this work by participating in meetings, developing appropriate sections, and bringing further NE CASC resources and support to bear when identified and requested.

Identifying and Evaluating Adaptation Science for Forest Habitats and Bird Communities in the Northeast

The forests of the Northeastern United States are home to some of the greatest diversity of nesting songbirds in the country. Climate change, shifts in natural disturbance regimes, and invasive species pose threats to forest habitats and bird species in the northeastern United States and represent major challenges to natural resource managers.
 

Air Quality Impacts of Climate-Induced Changes on Forest Composition

Forests play a role in air quality by supplying the atmosphere with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), precursors to ozone and aerosols. Different tree types emit different VOCs, each with different capacity to form ozone and aerosols. Therefore, shifts in forest composition may impact ozone and aerosol yields. Climate change is one of the expected drivers of forest change. In particular, the current range boundaries of a variety of species are expected to shift northward.

Predicting the fate and impact of watershed nutrient loads as Lake Michigan's hydrodynamics shift under climate change

Climate change is shifting the hydrodynamics and temperature of both the Great Lakes and their tributary rivers.  Both hydrology and temperature may play potent roles in mediating the magnitude of watershed nutrient load and their fate upon reaching the lake.  Tributary hydrology reflects the source of water (groundwater vs.

Bringing people, data, and models together – addressing impacts of climate change on stream temperature

This study set out to answer the question: “What data and modeling frameworks are needed to provide scientists reliable, climate-informed, water temperature estimates for freshwater ecosystems that can assist watershed management decision making?”  To accomplish this, the study gathered existing stream temperature data, identified data gaps, deployed stream temperature monitoring devices, and developed and tested a stream temperature model that could be regionalized across the Northeast Climate Science Center domain.

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