NE CSC Newsletter

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

News and upcoming events related to the Northeast Climate Science Center.

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A warm welcome to Michelle Staudinger, NE CSC Science Coordinator!    The NE CSC is pleased to welcome Michelle Staudinger as our new Science Coordinator.  Michelle joined our team after completing a postdoctoral position with the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center in Reston, VA.  She maintains a post-doctoral affiliation with NE CSC Consortium Institution University of Missouri Columbia, within the USGS Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit.  Her expertise and training includes marine science, fisheries, trophic ecology, and climate change impacts on biodiversity and ecosystems.  Recently she served as lead author on the National Climate Assessment's technical input report, "Impacts of Climate Change on Biodiversity, Ecosystems, and Ecosystem Services".  Michelle is also a lead author on two articles in an upcoming Special Issue in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment due out this fall.  We are excited that Michelle is joining the leadership team and look forward to her experience and enthusiasm in guiding the research collaborations of the NE CSC.

 

Arrival of new NE CSC Postdoctoral Fellow    Dr. Richard Feldman will be joining the UMass NE CSC team on July 1.  Dr. Feldman’s post-doctoral research will be focused on understanding how best to predict the response of birds to shifts in spatiotemporal variability of the environment. More specifically, he will evaluate the spatial relationships of migratory bird movements throughout the Gulf of Maine and how they are mediated by environmental factors, providing resource managers a tool for assessing effects of potential climate change and wind energy development on bird migration in the Gulf of Maine. His research will have direct relevance to the management of protected areas throughout the Gulf, and he will work with cooperators to develop and deliver outreach materials and activities as a part of the project. This research is a cooperative project between the Schoodic Education and Research Center at Acadia National Park, North Atlantic Coast Cooperative Ecosystems Studies Unit, University of Massachusetts Amherst, and the Northeast Climate Science Center.

 

 

Training Course: Forest Adaptation Planning and Practices - Adaptation in Action     August 20-21, 2013 - College of Menominee Nation, Keshena, WI.   Cost: $45 (includes meals).   Application deadline: June 28     This new course provides active, hands-on training for public, private, and tribal natural resource managers across the Midwest and Northeast who are interested in actively enhancing the ability of forests to cope with changing conditions. During this course, managers will learn how to incorporate climate change considerations into forest management planning and activities. Participants will use the report, "Forest Adaptation Resources: Climate Change Tools and Approaches" to identify practical adaptation actions for their own real-world forest management projects. The training will be held on August 20-21 in Keshena, WI, and cohosted by NIACS and NE CSC Consortium Institution, College of Menominee Nation Sustainable Development Institute.  Read more…

 

Science Coordination Meeting between Midwest LCCs and NECSC Consortium   A meeting was held at the University of Wisconsin Madison on May 23rd and attended by members of NE CSC Consortium Insitutions Universities of Minnesota and Wisconsin and the College of Menominee Nation as well as coordinators from the Plains and Prairie Potholes, Upper Midwest and Great Lakes, Eastern Tallgrass Prairie LCCs.  The objectives of the meeting included increasing the connections between LCCs and CSCs in the Midwest region, discussing science priorities, and developing ideas for leveraging funds and science capacity.  Specific discussions included the current science priorities of the LCCs and associated NE CSC capacities and the role of the NECSC to build capacity to focus on long-term research questions not readily addressed under the short funding cycles of the LCCs.  There was general agreement that coordination among the LCCs and NE CSC Consortium Institutions prior to the release of RFPs would allow for the development of research teams and proposals that were well suited for meeting the LCCs' science needs.  In short, the meeting was a success for both CSC and LCC attendees, and the group looks forward to future discussions to further coordinate and leverage important science issues in the Midwest region.   

 

Symposium on extreme weather patterns in the Northeast     The 8th Annual NOAA-CREST Symposium was held on June 5-6 at CUNY/City College of New York.  This year's Symposium focused on extreme weather patterns that hit the Northeast U.S.   The event assembles government administrators, climatologists, scholars, researchers, economists, social scientists and the media. Participants are able to share research ideas and results and have the opportunity to develop professional networks with other scientists and educators from various agencies and groups including NOAA, NASA and other federal agencies. Liang Ning, NE CSC Postdoctoral Fellow, gave a presentation about the teleconnections between winter climate extremes over Northeast U.S. and large-scale climate variability.  

 

Early Career Climate Forum website goes live!     A group of graduate students and early career researchers affiliated with Climate Science Centers around the country recently released a new website and blog called the Early Career Climate Forum. The objective of the effort is to build a national network of early career climate researchers and professionals centered around the Climate Science Centers. The creators hope the page will be a place where people can come together to collaboratively explore scientific ideas related to climate, share professional resources, trade ideas and tools about coping with graduate school and managing early career development, and create connections. They also hope the site can be a resource for the broader public on topics related to climate science, climate research, and climate researchers.  Read more…

 

Great Lakes region Tribes featured on ITEP website    The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals website states, "Climate change affects us all, but tribes have been particularly hard-hit by the impacts of atmospheric warming and the myriad changes it brings. It isn't just Alaska Natives who experience these changes; tribal members living close to the land in the lower 48 states are also seeing dramatic changes in the world around them. From fishing impacts in the Northwest to severe water depletion in the Southwest to heightened storm events along the Gulf Coast and Eastern seaboard, tribal communities see the impacts every day, and they've long since moved past the mindset of regarding climate change as a 'theory.'"  The ITEP presents profiles by region of various tribes and organizations that deal with, and attempt to respond to, climate change and its impacts.  Read more about Tribes in the Great Lakes Region:  

» Fond Du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa

» Forest County Potawatomi

» Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa

 

 

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Conservation Corridor - Connecting science to conservation    A new tool developed by the Southeast CSC!  Landscape corridors are among the most important conservation strategies in the face of global changes such as habitat fragmentation, habitat destruction, and climate change. The tool aims to bridge the science and practice of conservation corridors. Conservation Corridor will provide up-to-date findings from science that will inform applied conservation. And it will highlight new innovations in applied conservation, with the goal of guiding the direction of applied science toward management needs.  Read more...

 

 

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Tuesday June 25, 2013, 1 pm ET

USDA Forest Service Landscape Science Webinar Series

ForWarn, a real-time, satellite-based disturbance detection and decision-support system 

Dr. Bill Hargrove from USFS Southern Research Station

To join, visit:  http://www.fs.fed.us/research/docs/landscape-science/next-webinar.pdf

 

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Tuesday, July 9, 2013, 3:00 PM Eastern

NCCWSC Climate Change Science and Management Webinar Series presents, 

Can Camouflage Keep up With Climate Change? White Hares on Brown Snowless Backgrounds as a Model to Study Adaptation to Climate Stress

L. Scott Mills, University of Montana

To join, visit: https://nccwsc.usgs.gov/webinar/194

 

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Friday July 12, 2013 11:00 am-12:15 pm Pacific Time

Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals’ Environmental Education and Outreach Program presents,

Climate Change Outreach and Education- This presentation will provide information about outreach and education material and resources that tribes can use in engaging their tribal community about climate change. 

Mansel Nelson, Program Coordinator, Environmental Education and Outreach Program, Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals, Northern Arizona University

To register, visit: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1nAgeeuwQmCXaDxd2uQX1sz4uKaaqKWZQ6AfrC8fSi0M/viewform?pli=1

 

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Tuesday July 23, 2013, 1 pm ET

USDA Forest Service Landscape Science Webinar Series

Mapping Human-Ecological Interactions at the Landscape Scale: The Olympic Peninsula, WA

Lee Cerveny - Research Social Scientist, Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station

To join, visit:  http://www.fs.fed.us/research/docs/landscape-science/next-webinar.pdf

 

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Wednesday, July 24, 2013, 1:30-3:30 pm 

The National Research Council's Science and Technology for Sustainability Program (STS) and the University of California, Davis present, 

Sustainability for the Nation: Resource Connections and Governance Linkages  

To register for webcast, visit: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/sustainability/linkages/PGA_083319

 

 

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Tuesday, July 30, 2013, 3:30 PM Eastern

NCCWSC Climate Change Science and Management Webinar Series presents, 

Relationships among Climate, Water Quality and Toxic Blooms of Golden Alga in Texas

Reynaldo Patino, USGS Texas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

To join, visit:  https://nccwsc.usgs.gov/webinar/188

 

 

 

 

------ UPCOMING EVENTS: --------------------------------------------------------------

 

Training Course: Forest Adaptation Planning and Practices - Adaptation in Action       August 20-21, 2013 - College of Menominee Nation, Keshena, WI.   Cost: $45 (includes meals).   Application deadline: June 28.    See description above (under NE CSC News) or  Read more...

 

NCTC Course: Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment     August 27-29, 2013.  Application Deadline:  July 2.  This course is designed to guide conservation and resource management practitioners in two essential elements in the design of climate adaptation plans. Specifically, it will provide guidance in identifying which species or habitats are likely to be most strongly affected by projected changes; and understanding why these resources are likely to be vulnerable. Vulnerability Assessments are a critical tool in undertaking any climate change planning or implementation.  The target audience includes conservation practitioners from Federal and State fish and wildlife agencies and other conservation managers who work on natural resource issues and need to determine which resources are most vulnerable when setting priorities for conservation action.  Read more...

 

Association of Climate Change Officers Launches Inaugural Climate Strategies Forum on October 14-17, 2013 in Washington, D.C.     The Association of Climate Change Officers will host its inaugural Climate Strategies Forum to launch in-depth training programs in conjunction with their recent publication of Core Competencies for Climate Change Officers.  The Forum will feature prominent leaders from across sectors in a plenary format and a series of half-day boot camps aligned with the core competencies.  Plenary sessions will focus on climate and energy, and boot camps will focus on topics including adaptation planning, implementing change management schemes, and building a public-private partnership project.  Read more...

 

 

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The Urban Buzz - new project on 17-year cicadas      Now, at this very moment, we have a tremendous opportunity to sample 17-year cicadas over a wide geographic area, across a range of landscapes from forested to urban.  The Your Wildlife Team is launching an exciting new citizen science project to look at the effects of urbanization on 17-year cicadas -- We're asking folks within the Brood II emergence zone (from Georgia to Connecticut) to collect 5-10 cicadas and send them to us, with a point location (from which we'll use GIS resources to glean urbanization info). We'll then measure various physical traits of the cicadas to assess fluctuating asymmetry (a potential indicator of environmental stress) -- We predict that fluctuating asymmetry increases with urbanization.  Read more...

 

New USDA Regional Climate Hubs, New Research Tools, Uniform Policy Guidelines Will Help Producers Mitigate Threats, Adapt for the Future      Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today said that the Federal government must increase collaboration with producers, researchers and industry to develop the next generation of solutions that will help agriculture mitigate and adapt to modern climate challenges.  Read more…

 

Call for Papers: Great Plains Symposium - "Drought in the Life Cultures, and Landscapes of the Great Plains."     Scientists and scholars from across the full spectrum of disciplines are invited to share their expertise and perspectives as the symposium explores all aspects, causes, impacts, projections, social and cultural consequences, and ramifications of drought. The 40th annual Center for Great Plains Studies symposium is a collaboration with the National Drought Mitigation Center and the Robert B. Daugherty Water for Food Institute.  For more information, contact cgps@unl.edu or Read more…

 

Case study from Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange (CAKE) Project Clean Lake: Updating Cleveland’s Sewer Systems to Reduce Stormwater Overflows    The Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District created Project Clean Lake to reduce combined sewer outflow discharge to less than 98% by 2035. The project was formed after the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) determined that the sewer district’s discharge rates into Lake Erie were in violation of the Clean Water Act. The project includes a combination of updates to existing infrastructure and the development of green infrastructure to help capture and retain stormwater flow. Climate change is expected to cause an increase in intense precipitation; this project will help to reduce the negative impacts climate change may pose to the city.  Read more...

 

Climate change: New England crab chowder     Goodbye lobster, hello blue crab? Farewell to cod and haddock, welcome croaker and golden tilefish? In a troubling and far-reaching study of fish migration, recently published in the journal Nature, scientists from the University of British Columbia found that global warming is causing some species previously seen only in warm-water climates to push northward. Read more...

 

Hudson River communities receive planning grants    ALBANY, New York — The Department of Environmental Conservation has awarded three grants totaling $170,000 for task forces in Hudson River estuary communities to prepare for sea-level rise and waterfront flooding related to climate change.  The money is from the DEC's Hudson River Estuary Program in partnership with the New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission.  Read more…

 

Measuring Landscape Disturbance of Gas Exploration in Fayette and Lycoming Counties    Landscape change in Pennsylvania's Fayette and Lycoming counties resulting from construction of well pads, new roads and pipelines for natural gas and coalbed methane exploration is being documented to help determine the potential consequences for ecosystems and wildlife, according to a recent U.S. Geological Survey report.  Read more...

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warn against health impacts of climate change   Weather and climate have affected human health for millennia. Now, climate change is altering weather and climate patterns that previously have been relatively stable. Climate experts are particularly confident that climate change will bring increasingly frequent and severe heat waves and extreme weather events, as well as a rise in sea levels. These changes have the potential to affect human health in several direct and indirect ways, some of them severe.  Read more...  

 

Study Finds Heat Related Mortality to Increase with Climate Change    A May 19 article published in Nature Climate Change concludes that climate change could increase the number of heat-related deaths in New York City by 22 percent by the 2020s, and by as much as 91 percent by the 2080s. The researchers also found that even when warmer winters were taken into account, the overall temperature-related mortality rate would likely still rise by as much as 31 percent by 2080. Cities like New York are especially vulnerable to increasing temperatures due to the absorption of heat by the built infrastructure, which turn cities into “heat islands” and maintain warm temperatures at night.   Read more…

 

Study: Earth “Very Likely” to Warm More than Two Degrees Celsius by End of Century     A study published May 26 in Nature Climate Change concludes that if current greenhouse gas emissions trends continue, the Earth will likely warm more than two degrees Celsius, but not more than six degrees Celsius, by 2100. Researchers used historical measurements of carbon dioxide concentrations and global temperature observations to help reduce uncertainty of the future behavior of the carbon cycle – which according to study’s climate model, is the second most important contributor to uncertainty in temperature projections for the 21st century.  Read more...

 

Mayors Pledge to Prepare Cities for Extreme Weather    On June 17, more than 45 mayors and other elected officials from U.S. cities pledged to make their communities more resilient to extreme weather and energy and economic challenges. The pledge, the Resilient Communities for America Agreement, includes a commitment to use more renewable energy and make buildings and infrastructure more energy efficient, as well as a commitment to share information and solutions.  Read more…

 

Refining Species Translocation as a Conservation Tool    Eastern box turtles are increasingly susceptible to local extirpation as adult survivorship declines across the species’ range. Research has shown significant decreases in Eastern box turtle populations due to habitat destruction, degradation, and fragmentation, as well as commercial exploitation for the pet and food trades, and death from road kills. Translocation and reintroduction methods have been used in varying success.   Read more...

 

Water Levels Fall in Great Lakes, Taking a Toll on Shipping     Aboard the Dorothy Ann, in Lake Erie near Fairport Harbor, Ohio — As Capt. Jeremy R. Mock steered this 711-foot combination of tug and barge toward a harbor berth, a screen of red numbers indicated the decreasing depth of water under the vessel: 6 feet, 3.6 feet, 2 feet.  Suddenly the numbers gave way to a line of red dashes: — — — — .  It was a signal that there was not enough water to measure.  Read more...

 

New Climate Data Depict a City More at Risk     The Bloomberg administration on Monday issued new warnings about New York City’s vulnerability to climate change, offering updated data to encourage businesses, residents and perhaps even future mayors to better prepare against hotter weather, fiercer storms and increased rainfall.  Read more...

 

Cities talk climate change     The New England Climate Adaptation Project (NECAP) is organized by the MIT Science Impact Collaborate, the Consensus Building Institute and the National Estuarine Research Reserve. The project is being conducted in four communities around the region. The goal is to get municipalities thinking about the future, and what they might do to protect their city or town from the potential impacts of climate change.  Read more or visit NECAP… 

 

NCDC Releases 2012 Billion-Dollar Weather and Climate Disasters Information     According to NCDC’s 2012 weather and climate disasters information, 2012 saw 11 weather and climate disaster events each with losses exceeding $1 billion in damages. This makes 2012 the second costliest year since 1980, with a total of more than $110 billion in damages throughout the year. The 2012 total damages rank only behind 2005, which incurred $160 billion in damages due in part to four devastating land-falling hurricanes.  Read more...

 

New Study: When You Account For The Oceans, Global Warming Continues Apace    There’s a new study out (and unfortunately gated) from European researchers in Nature Climate Change adding to the case that the oceans have absorbed much of the effect of global warming since 2000.  Read more...

 

Four Ways the Government Subsidizes Risky Coastal Rebuilding   Contractors with the Army Corps of Engineers last month finished pumping more than 1.8 million cubic yards of sand onto the beach in Ocean City, N.J., which had been damaged by Hurricane Sandy.  Using a combination of Sandy aid and funds already earmarked for adding sand to beaches, the federal government picked up $14 million of the roughly $18 million tab. And it’s not the first time Washington has paid to dredge up sand and pump it onto Ocean City’s beaches.  Read more…

 

Residents Encouraged to Participate in Appalachian Bat Survey     Pennsylvania Game Commission biologists are seeking assistance from residents in a regional monitoring effort to collect bat maternity colony data this summer. This monitoring is especially important to measure bat mortalities caused by White-Nose Syndrome (WNS), a disease that affects hibernating bats in Pennsylvania and other parts of the eastern United States. Read more…

 

NRCS, Landowners Improve Habitat for At-risk Species    Through voluntary conservation, American farmers, ranchers and forestland owners are restoring and protecting habitat for seven at-risk wildlife species. Read more…

 

Highway agencies, wildlife ecologists focus on culverts in climate change adaptation planning     Wildlife may benefit from plans to rebuild aging or storm-damaged culverts in areas where extreme weather events are taking a toll. Read more...

 

 

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EPA Releases Guide to Energy Efficiency in Water and Wastewater Facilities for Local Government     EPA has released a new climate and energy strategy guide for local governments, entitled "Energy Efficiency in Water and Wastewater Facilities: A Guide to Developing and Implementing Greenhouse Gas Reduction Programs."  Water and wastewater facilities are among the largest consumers of energy in a community, accounting for 35 percent of typical U.S. municipal energy budgets.   Download report…

 

NOAA's Climate Ready Great Lakes Offers Free Online Training Modules     NOAA's Climate Ready Great Lakes posted three training modules online designed to help create a Great Lakes region that is "climate ready."  These modules provide stakeholders and decision makers with clear information about the Great Lakes climate, as well as strategies on adaptation.  This project was sponsored by the Great Lakes Sea Grant Network and the NOAA Great Lakes Regional Collaboration Team.    Read more...

 

FEMA Report: Climate Change Could Increase Areas At Risk of Flood by 45%    Rising seas and increasingly severe weather are expected to increase the areas of the US at risk of floods by up to 45 percent by 2100, according to a first-of-its-kind report released by the Federal Emergency Management Agency on Wednesday. These changes could double the number of flood-prone properties covered by the National Flood Insurance Program and drastically increase the costs of floods, the report finds.  Read more or Download report… 

 

 

Wildlife population and harvest trends in the United States: A technical document supporting the Forest Service 2010 RPA Assessment    The Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act (RPA) of 1974 requires periodic assessments of the condition and trends of the nation's renewable natural resources. America's wildlife resources will continue to be pressured by diverse demands for ecosystem services from humans. Collaborative planning and management among private and public land owners, and which spans the research and management branches of the Forest Service, will be vital to conserving and sustaining the nation's wildlife resources.  Read more...

 

 

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Climate Funding Opportunities (June 2013)   NOAA has compiled a list of Climate Funding Opportunities. This document provides a snapshot of currently available, climate-related funding opportunities (as of June 3, 2013). This document is updated twice per year.  Read more...

 

 

National Landscape Conservation Cooperative Funding Opportunity     Funding through the National Landscape Conservation Cooperative network is now available through grants.gov under the title Landscape Conservation Cooperatives – Addressing National Science, Conservation Information, and Related Decision Support Needs (Grant opportunity number: F13AS00196)  Read more...

 

USDA 2014 National Urban and Community Forestry Grant Program - Application Due: July 15, 2013     The USDA National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council seeks grant proposals to address the following priority issues: 1) Making Urban Trees and Forests More Resilient to the Impacts of Natural Disasters and the long-term Impacts of Climate Change; 2) Green Infrastructure Jobs Analysis; 3) Utilizing Green Infrastructure to Manage and Mitigate Stormwater to Improve Water Quality. Potential grantees should work collaboratively with other organizations and entities not traditionally involved in urban and community forestry.  Read more…