NE CASC News

Life in the "Slow Lane": CASC Refugia Research Featured in Special Issue of Top Journal

Monday, June 1, 2020

As countless scientific studies and news stories have documented, anthropogenic climate change is expected to have profoundly negative impacts on wildlife, habitats and ecosystems around the globe. In the coming decades, multitudes of species will be subjected to increasing environmental stress, and biodiversity may significantly decline.

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New Publication: Prioritizing Range-Shifting Invasive Plants Based on Impact

Thursday, May 7, 2020
Range-shifting Invasive Plant

Invasive species are shifting their ranges in response to climate change.  The Northeast has been identified as a ‘hotspot’ where up to 100 warm-adapted, range-shifting invasive plants could establish before 2050. But, effectively monitoring and managing for 100 species is an impractical and unrealistic strategy. Writing in Biological Invasions, NE CASC researchers have recently identified a more practical number of species to manage by using an IUCN recommended impacts assessment called the Environmental Impacts Classification of Alien Taxa (EICAT).

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Project Completed: Development of a Wildlife Adaptation Menu for Resource Managers

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

A team lead by NE CASC deputy federal director Olivia LeDee has completed the project "Development of a Wildlife Adaptation Menu for Resource Managers".

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New Publication: The Role of Sand Lances in the Northwest Atlantic Ecosystem

Sunday, April 26, 2020
A parent tern and chick feed on a sand lance.

Though it is a comparatively small aquatic creature, the sand lance plays a significant role in sustaining the dynamic ecosystem of the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Sometimes described as a “quintessential forage fish,” the sand lance serves as a food source for myriad predators, including marine mammals, seabirds, and larger fish such as Atlantic sturgeon, cod, and bluefin tuna. Despite its ecological importance, however, most aspects of the sand lance’s ecology, population dynamics and vulnerability to current and future stressors in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (NWA) are poorly understood.

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New Publication: Multi-Species Occupancy Models

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Over the past decade, newer technologies such as drones and trail cameras have revolutionized wildlife monitoring, particularly by facilitating multi-species community studies. While this work has great potential to inform conservation planning, a new paper analyzing 92 such projects suggests that their reliability may be undermined by methodological flaws or misapplication of analytical tools.

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Investigating the Impact of Declining Lake Ice: Hilary Dugan's Research Featured on Wisconsin Public Radio

Thursday, February 20, 2020
Hilary Dugan's research team prepares to conduct an experiment on a frozen lake in Vilas County, Wisconsin.

Over the past century, ice cover in many Wisconsin lakes has declined by an average of one month during winter. Yet the consequences of this pronounced shift are unknown. The research of Hilary Dugan, an NE CASC principal investigator, aims to unravel this mystery by exploring the implications of ice loss for the health of Wisconsin lakes and the aquatic life inside them.

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NE CASC Receives $1 Million Funding Increase

Thursday, January 23, 2020

The federal government has increased its support for the Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (NE CASC), hosted at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, by approximately $1 million over the next year. This additional funding, which supplements the five-year, $4.5 million grant renewal awarded to the center last fall, will advance its mission of developing the knowledge and tools necessary to help fish, wildlife, and ecosystems adapt to the impacts of climate change. 

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