NECSC Stakeholder Outreach and Science Planning Meetings

January 9-10 – UMass, Amherst     |     January 17-18  – UMN, St. Paul

The NE CSC sends a warm thank you to all who participated in the NE CSC's first two Stakeholder Outreach and Science Planning meetings.  Both meetings attracted a broad and diverse array of more than 150 natural resource management stakeholders from federal institutions such as US Fish & Wildlife, US EPA, and NOAA to municipal leaders, non-governmental organizations, and tribal representatives.  The meetings were structured around paired presentations from both Consortium scientists and representative stakeholders according to our seven science themes, all related to climate change adaptation through natural resource management.  All participants provided comments on specific science needs essential to their organization in planning for climate change.  The NE CSC is incorporating this valuable feedback into the 5-year Strategic Science Agenda, which will guide the future science directions of the Center.

We have posted presentations and full summaries of both meetings from our facilitators at the Keystone Center.  Please take a look (use links at right)!

 

NECSC Objective: Improve the way climate science informs resource management in the Northeast. Provide scientific information, tools, and techniques that managers and other parties interested in land, water, wildlife and cultural resources can use to anticipate, monitor, and adapt to climate change in the Northeast region.

Meeting Objectives:

  • Share and receive feedback on the draft science themes and priorities and how they fit with the climate science needs of NECSC stakeholders and partners
  • Create new and expand existing communication networks to exchange and disseminate climate science research and seek input about preferred methods of engagement between NECSC and stakeholders

We are still accepting feedback!  Please contact us about any of the following:

  • What does success look like for the NECSC from your perspective?  (Would you be willing to talk about your vision/ideals for the NE CSC in a video?)
  • Please send us communication links and contacts from your organization so that we can be sure to connect with your organization's news and events.
  • Where are the biggest gaps in climate science information and tools that the NE CSC can help to fill?
  • Are there particular areas that the NE CSC should rely on other partners and not use its limited resources? In other words, you've told us what the NE CSC should do.  Now help us narrow the list by suggesting some things that the NE CSC does not need to do.

Participants say...

 

"The Northeast Climate Science Center will bring a critical new perspective to natural resource managers as they focus on the task at hand-- managing fish and wildlife resources in a changing climate,"  said Glen Salmon, coordinator for the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers LCC. Salmon and other LCC partners participated in the recent NE CSC workshop to collaborate on landscape level priorities with NE CSC stakeholders and partners. "The concept that everything will remain constant in nature just doesn't hold up anymore. We need to be better informed to help landowners and natural resources managers make the best decisions possible.  The better informed we are as a conservation community, the better chance we have to conserve and protect our natural resources now and in the future."

Glen Salmon, Coordinator, Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers LCC

 

"I'm excited and very encouraged that the NE CSC is engaging both the scientific and the practitioner community in the critical dialogue needed to inform what climate research is needed and most useful to on-the-ground management of natural resources. We need to recognize that natural areas and green spaces occur along a gradient of development and urbanization- from large tracts of national and state forests to fragmented oases of nature and biodiversity surrounded by cities, people and industrialization. It's vital we assess the needs of all these systems, and provide information that can help to inform science-based adaptation strategies needed to increase the resiliency of natural areas throughout the nation in the face of climate change. I am honored to be a part of this collaborative work and believe Chicago Wilderness will benefit greatly from this partnership."  

Abigail Derby, Chicago Wilderness

 

"I had the honor to attend the USGS Northeast Climate Science Center's Stakeholder Workshop in Amherst, MA the week of January 7th.  Of the many take home messages for me, what stood out was the strong commitment among all to work together to advance our climate science efforts.  There were an amazing number of stakeholders from federal, state, local, and non-profit organizations, all talking with each other, all informing each other, and all building relationships.  I believe the NECSC has already proven its value with this effort and look forward to continuing with our interactions.  I know the Forest Service's Northern Research Station's climate science efforts will be more effective through our partnership with the NECSC."

Thomas L. Schmidt, Assistant Director, Northern Research Station, USDA Forest Service

 

"I'm very encouraged at the eagerness of the NE CSC team to really engage with the wider community, and their commitment that success will only happen if their stakeholders find the products useful. The recent stakeholder meeting in Minneapolis was a great opportunity to meet the key NE CSC players and build connections with people and organizations with mutual interest in climate change response or adaptation.   I look forward to the collaboration."

Bob Krumenaker, Superintendent, NPS Apostle Islands National Lakeshore