The Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center works with natural and cultural resource managers in the Northeast and Midwest regions to apply future climate scenarios to decision making and co-produce information, and tools for climate change adaptation.

 

UMass Amherst Master's student Keenan Yakola has been working to understand the impacts climate change will have on nesting seabirds in the Gulf of Maine.  He recently was awarded Best Student Paper at the Pacific Seabird Group annual meeting.

Photo: Earl Johnson

NE CASC Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellows assembled in the north woods of New Hampshire to learn about climate science, co-production and building multi-disciplinary research relationships.

The Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (note our new name!) is proud to present its 2017 annual report.  Recent projects, events, research activities, and Fellow’s work are highlighted.  

NE CASC Postdoctoral Research Fellow Madeline Magee studies how Wisconsin lakes are changing under the effects of climate change and land use. After receiving her Ph.D in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Wisconsin Madison, she continued her works as a postdoctoral research...

NE CSC's Regional Science Meeting:  Incorporating Climate Science in the Management of Natural and Cultural Resources in the Midwest and Northeast took place May 15-17, 2017 on the UMass Amherst Campus.    Click READ MORE for the proceedings. 

Photo: Toni Klemm

Katie Booras is a Northeast Climate Science Center graduate fellow who recieved a Master’s in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.  Her work focuses directly on managing water resources for a changing climate.

Take a trip with Paul and his team into the field!  We’ve updated our highlight of Paul with a neat video that paints a picture of one aspect of his Ph.D. investigation into how brook trout are affected by and adapt to climate change.  

Photo: Andy Castillo

This recent Fellow with the Northeast Climate Science Center does a lot of work behind the scenes, but his research on salt marshes is vital to many systems, from the scallops in a Florida bay, to important decision-making agencies on Long Island. 

NE CASC Graduate Fellow Pearl May works with a team at the University of Wisconsin to help Dane County, WI officials understand the potential flooding risks in the area.  Their storm transposition tool assesses the potential impacts of a known storm transposed on a different location - in this case the city and infrastructure of Madison, Wisconsin.

Photo: Dana O'Shea

The 2015 NE CSC Fellows Retreat was held September 22-25 in Suring, Wisconsin. Twenty Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellows gathered to share their research, develop collaborations, and learn from stakeholders and scientists who have established strong working relationships.

Photo: Thomas Bonnot, NE CSC Graduate Fellow

The NE CASC’s Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellows are actively engaged in research that provides scientific information and tools that natural resource managers can use to aid climate adaptation in the Northeast region.  What are they working on and who will benefit from their research?  Watch the video!

NE CSC Fellow David Johnson was standing in a salt marsh on the northern Massachusetts coast when he saw a fiddler crab, Uca pugnax, nearly 50 miles north of its supposed natural range. The migration north of this charismatic crab with the big, waving claw may be yet another sign of climate change.

Photo: David Johnson

NE CASC News

NE CASC e-Newsletters

Project Completed: Mapping Climate Change-Resistant Vernal Pools in the Northeastern U.S.

Friday, June 12, 2020
Vernal Pool

The research team of Jennifer Cartwright, Toni Lyn Morelli and Evan Grant have completed the project, "Mapping Climate Change Resistant Vernal Pools in the Northeastern U.S.," which investigated existing management concerns that climate change may cause some vernal pools to dry earlier in the season than they have historically. 

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Combating Racism, Pursuing Justice: NE CASC Statement on Recent Events

Thursday, June 11, 2020

The Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center stands in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement in its commitment to eradicating white supremacy and pursuing an inclusive, equitable, and just society. We condemn the systemic racism and bigotry that have plagued American society for centuries and remain a malignancy within our most powerful institutions. 

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Project Completed: Biological Thresholds and Mechanisms for Species Responses to Climate Change

Thursday, June 4, 2020
Lynx

A team led by Curtice Griffin recently completed the NE CASC project, "Mechanisms for species responses to climate change: Are there biological thresholds?"

This work responds to the widespread impacts of climate change on species and ecosystems across the NE CASC region along with the accompanying need to better equip natural resource managers with information that will help them maintain ecological function and species persistence as climate change becomes more intense. 

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Life in the (Biodiverse) Slow Lane: CASC Refugia Research Featured in Special Issue of Top Journal

Monday, June 1, 2020

As countless scientific studies and news stories have documented, anthropogenic climate change is expected to have profoundly negative impacts on wildlife, habitats and ecosystems around the globe. In the coming decades, multitudes of species will be subjected to increasing environmental stress, and biodiversity may significantly decline.

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New Publication: Prioritizing Range-Shifting Invasive Plants Based on Impact

Thursday, May 7, 2020
Range-shifting Invasive Plant

Invasive species are shifting their ranges in response to climate change.  The Northeast has been identified as a ‘hotspot’ where up to 100 warm-adapted, range-shifting invasive plants could establish before 2050. But, effectively monitoring and managing for 100 species is an impractical and unrealistic strategy. Writing in Biological Invasions, a team of NE CASC researchers led by Bethany Bradley has recently identified a more practical number of species to manage by using an IUCN recommended impacts assessment called the Environmental Impacts Classification of Alien Taxa (EICAT).

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Project Completed: Development of a Wildlife Adaptation Menu for Resource Managers

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

A team lead by NE CASC deputy federal director Olivia LeDee has completed the project "Development of a Wildlife Adaptation Menu for Resource Managers".

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New Publication: The Role of Sand Lances in the Northwest Atlantic Ecosystem

Sunday, April 26, 2020
A parent tern and chick feed on a sand lance.

Though it is a comparatively small aquatic creature, the sand lance plays a significant role in sustaining the dynamic ecosystem of the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Sometimes described as a “quintessential forage fish,” the sand lance serves as a food source for myriad predators, including marine mammals, seabirds, and larger fish such as Atlantic sturgeon, cod, and bluefin tuna. Despite its ecological importance, however, most aspects of the sand lance’s ecology, population dynamics and vulnerability to current and future stressors in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (NWA) are poorly understood.

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New Publication: Multi-Species Occupancy Models

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Over the past decade, newer technologies such as drones and trail cameras have revolutionized wildlife monitoring, particularly by facilitating multi-species community studies. While this work has great potential to inform conservation planning, a new paper analyzing 92 such projects suggests that their reliability may be undermined by methodological flaws or misapplication of analytical tools.

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