NE CASC News

NE CASC Appoints Three Graduate Assistants to Advance DEI Goals

Thursday, September 17, 2020

Acting on our commitment to help dismantle environmental racism and pursue a more just society, NE CASC recently appointed three graduate assistants who will lead projects designed to advance the Center’s diversity, equity, and inclusion goals. 

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NE CASC Tribal Climate Science Liaison Casey Thornbrugh Wins 2020 Climate Adaptation Leadership Award

Wednesday, September 16, 2020
Casey Thornbrugh

NE CASC Tribal Climate Science Liaison Casey Thornbrugh recently received a 2020 Climate Adaptation Leadership Award. This marks the second consecutive year that an NE CASC representative has claimed this prestigious honor.

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The Return of the Brown-Headed Nuthatch: NE CASC PIs Help Restore Ecosystem, Evaluate Conservation Technique

Tuesday, September 15, 2020
Brown-headed Nuthatch

Extirpated from Missouri's Ozark Highlands more than a century ago, the brown-headed nuthatch is now poised for a comeback in this area thanks in part to the work of NE CASC principal investigators Thomas Bonnot and Frank Thompson. Their project will help restore the native ecosystem and evaluate a conservation technique known as assisted migration. 

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Morelli Organizes Special Session on Climate Change Refugia at NACCB Symposium

Friday, September 4, 2020

NE CASC Research Ecologist Toni Lyn Morelli and colleagues from the Refugia Research Coalition organized a session on "Innovative Approaches for Identifying and Managing Climate Change Refugia" at the recently held 2020 North American Congress for Conservation Biology Symposium. Presentations for the session were recorded and are available for viewing. 

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Understanding Translational Invasion Ecology: NE CASC Organizes Session at ESA

Friday, August 28, 2020
Water Chestnuts

NE CASC researchers Bethany Bradley and Toni Lyn Morelli organized a session at the recent Ecological Society of America annual meeting to help members of the invasive species community better understand the paradigm of Translational Invasion Ecology. Session talks were recorded and are ready for viewing! 

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Project Completed: Slowing the Flow for Climate Resilience

Wednesday, August 26, 2020
Connecticut River

Principal Investigators Richard Palmer and Keith Nislow have completed their final report for the project "Slowing the Flow for Climate Resilience: Reducing Vulnerability to Extreme Flood and Drought Events".This research underscores the importance of riparian conservation and restoration in providing ecosystem services such as flood risk mitigation under a climate-altered future. 

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NE CASC Fellow Nigel Golden Delivers Ambrose Jearld Jr. Lecture on Diversity & Inclusion

Monday, August 10, 2020

Nigel Golden, an NE CASC fellow and a doctoral student in environmental conservation at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, recently presented the 2020 Ambrose Jearld Jr. Lecture on Diversity and Inclusion in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

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Registration Open for Online Workshop: Biological Thresholds in the Context of Climate Adaptation

Tuesday, August 4, 2020

NE CASC invites members of the climate adaptation community to participate in our upcoming online workshop, "Biological Thresholds in the Context of Climate Adaptation. This event will take place on October 7-8, 2020. 

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Position Opening: Research Fellow

Tuesday, July 14, 2020

The Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center is seeking a PhD student to conduct research on the interactive effects of climate change, recovery from acidification, and changes in trophic status on bioenergetics and contaminant bioaccumulation in stream fishes of the northeastern US.

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Project Completed: Mapping Climate Change-Resistant Vernal Pools in the Northeastern U.S.

Friday, June 12, 2020
Vernal Pool

The research team of Jennifer Cartwright, Toni Lyn Morelli and Evan Grant have completed the project, "Mapping Climate Change Resistant Vernal Pools in the Northeastern U.S.," which investigated existing management concerns that climate change may cause some vernal pools to dry earlier in the season than they have historically. 

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Combating Racism, Pursuing Justice: NE CASC Statement on Recent Events

Thursday, June 11, 2020

The Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center stands in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement in its commitment to eradicating white supremacy and pursuing an inclusive, equitable, and just society. We condemn the systemic racism and bigotry that have plagued American society for centuries and remain a malignancy within our most powerful institutions. 

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Project Completed: Biological Thresholds and Mechanisms for Species Responses to Climate Change

Thursday, June 4, 2020
Lynx

A team led by Curtice Griffin recently completed the NE CASC project, "Mechanisms for species responses to climate change: Are there biological thresholds?"

This work responds to the widespread impacts of climate change on species and ecosystems across the NE CASC region along with the accompanying need to better equip natural resource managers with information that will help them maintain ecological function and species persistence as climate change becomes more intense. 

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Life in the (Biodiverse) Slow Lane: CASC Refugia Research Featured in Special Issue of Top Journal

Monday, June 1, 2020

As countless scientific studies and news stories have documented, anthropogenic climate change is expected to have profoundly negative impacts on wildlife, habitats and ecosystems around the globe. In the coming decades, multitudes of species will be subjected to increasing environmental stress, and biodiversity may significantly decline.

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New Publication: Prioritizing Range-Shifting Invasive Plants Based on Impact

Thursday, May 7, 2020
Range-shifting Invasive Plant

Invasive species are shifting their ranges in response to climate change.  The Northeast has been identified as a ‘hotspot’ where up to 100 warm-adapted, range-shifting invasive plants could establish before 2050. But, effectively monitoring and managing for 100 species is an impractical and unrealistic strategy. Writing in Biological Invasions, a team of NE CASC researchers led by Bethany Bradley has recently identified a more practical number of species to manage by using an IUCN recommended impacts assessment called the Environmental Impacts Classification of Alien Taxa (EICAT).

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Project Completed: Development of a Wildlife Adaptation Menu for Resource Managers

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

A team lead by NE CASC deputy federal director Olivia LeDee has completed the project "Development of a Wildlife Adaptation Menu for Resource Managers".

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New Publication: The Role of Sand Lances in the Northwest Atlantic Ecosystem

Sunday, April 26, 2020
A parent tern and chick feed on a sand lance.

Though it is a comparatively small aquatic creature, the sand lance plays a significant role in sustaining the dynamic ecosystem of the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Sometimes described as a “quintessential forage fish,” the sand lance serves as a food source for myriad predators, including marine mammals, seabirds, and larger fish such as Atlantic sturgeon, cod, and bluefin tuna. Despite its ecological importance, however, most aspects of the sand lance’s ecology, population dynamics and vulnerability to current and future stressors in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (NWA) are poorly understood.

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New Publication: Multi-Species Occupancy Models

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Over the past decade, newer technologies such as drones and trail cameras have revolutionized wildlife monitoring, particularly by facilitating multi-species community studies. While this work has great potential to inform conservation planning, a new paper analyzing 92 such projects suggests that their reliability may be undermined by methodological flaws or misapplication of analytical tools.

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Investigating the Impact of Declining Lake Ice: Hilary Dugan's Research Featured on Wisconsin Public Radio

Thursday, February 20, 2020
Hilary Dugan's research team prepares to conduct an experiment on a frozen lake in Vilas County, Wisconsin.

Over the past century, ice cover in many Wisconsin lakes has declined by an average of one month during winter. Yet the consequences of this pronounced shift are unknown. The research of Hilary Dugan, an NE CASC principal investigator, aims to unravel this mystery by exploring the implications of ice loss for the health of Wisconsin lakes and the aquatic life inside them.

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NE CASC Receives $1 Million Funding Increase

Thursday, January 23, 2020

The federal government has increased its support for the Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (NE CASC), hosted at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, by approximately $1 million over the next year. This additional funding, which supplements the five-year, $4.5 million grant renewal awarded to the center last fall, will advance its mission of developing the knowledge and tools necessary to help fish, wildlife, and ecosystems adapt to the impacts of climate change. 

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Take the NE CASC Communications Survey

Thursday, January 9, 2020

The NE CASC invites all members of the climate adaptation community to help us assess our communications efforts by participating in a communications survey. Your feedback will play an integral role in guiding the redevelopment of our website and enhancing our expansive collection of other materials, including our newsletter and annual report.

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New Publication: The Fate of Madagascar's Rainforest Habitat

Friday, January 3, 2020
Ruffed Lemur

Species around the world are facing habitat degradation resulting from overharvesting, overhunting, invasive species, and pollution, in addition to climate change. A new paper by NE CASC researcher Toni Lyn Morelli and her collaborators details the severe impacts of deforestation and climate change in Madagascar, a biodiversity hotspot and habitat to two critically endangered species of ruffed lemur found nowhere else in the world. These lemurs are indicators of overall rainforest health and play a critical role in seed dispersal across the ecosystem.  

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Call for Statements of Interest: Fiscal Year 2020 Research Awards

Friday, December 13, 2019

The Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (NE CASC) is pleased to announce a call for statements of interest regarding Fiscal Year 2020 Research Awards. Please note that the eligibility criteria and submission deadline for statements of interest relevant to the Midwest have recently been revised. Read below for details. 

Available funding for the Northeastern region is $800,000-$1,000,000. Funding for individual projects will not exceed $390,000.

Available funding for the Midwestern region is $3,000,000. Funding for individual projects will not exceed $600,000.

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Project Update: Assessing Climate Change Threats and Actions in Northeast State Wildlife Action Plans

Monday, December 9, 2019

Karen Terwilliger has released an interim report detailing results from the first year of her work on the NE CASC project "Assessing Climate Change Threats and Actions in Northeast State Wildlife Action Plans". This research synthesizes and prioritizes climate change threats and associated adaptation strategies for regional species of greatest conservation need as identified in recent State Wildlife Action Plans to support coordinated conservation and adaptation by Northeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (NEAFWA) states.

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College of Menominee Nation Continues Tribal Adaptation Menu Workshop Series

Monday, November 25, 2019
Group photo of participants in Keshena Tribal Adaptation Menu Workshop

The College of Menominee Nation, an NE CASC consortium institution, recently partnered with the Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science (NIACS) and the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC) to host the fourth in a series of Tribal Adaptation Menu Workshops that commenced in early 2019 and will continue throughout 2020. These events have been organized to help Tribal natural resource managers identify priorities, challenges, and areas of concern as they create action plans for adaptation and resilience. 

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