NE CASC News

NE CASC Receives $1 Million Funding Increase

Thursday, January 23, 2020

The federal government has increased its support for the Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (NE CASC), hosted at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, by approximately $1 million over the next year. This additional funding, which supplements the five-year, $4.5 million grant renewal awarded to the center last fall, will advance its mission of developing the knowledge and tools necessary to help fish, wildlife, and ecosystems adapt to the impacts of climate change. 

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Take the NE CASC Communications Survey

Thursday, January 9, 2020

The NE CASC invites all members of the climate adaptation community to help us assess our communications efforts by participating in a communications survey. Your feedback will play an integral role in guiding the redevelopment of our website and enhancing our expansive collection of other materials, including our newsletter and annual report.

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New Publication: The Fate of Madagascar's Rainforest Habitat

Friday, January 3, 2020
Ruffed Lemur

Species around the world are facing habitat degradation resulting from overharvesting, overhunting, invasive species, and pollution, in addition to climate change. A new paper by NE CASC researcher Toni Lyn Morelli and her collaborators details the severe impacts of deforestation and climate change in Madagascar, a biodiversity hotspot and habitat to two critically endangered species of ruffed lemur found nowhere else in the world. These lemurs are indicators of overall rainforest health and play a critical role in seed dispersal across the ecosystem.  

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Call for Statements of Interest: Fiscal Year 2020 Research Awards

Friday, December 13, 2019

The Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (NE CASC) is pleased to announce a call for statements of interest regarding Fiscal Year 2020 Research Awards. Please note that the eligibility criteria and submission deadline for statements of interest relevant to the Midwest have recently been revised. Read below for details. 

Available funding for the Northeastern region is $800,000-$1,000,000. Funding for individual projects will not exceed $390,000.

Available funding for the Midwestern region is $3,000,000. Funding for individual projects will not exceed $600,000.

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Project Update: Assessing Climate Change Threats and Actions in Northeast State Wildlife Action Plans

Monday, December 9, 2019

Karen Terwilliger has released an interim report detailing results from the first year of her work on the NE CASC project "Assessing Climate Change Threats and Actions in Northeast State Wildlife Action Plans". This research synthesizes and prioritizes climate change threats and associated adaptation strategies for regional species of greatest conservation need as identified in recent State Wildlife Action Plans to support coordinated conservation and adaptation by Northeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (NEAFWA) states.

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College of Menominee Nation Continues Tribal Adaptation Menu Workshop Series

Monday, November 25, 2019
Group photo of participants in Keshena Tribal Adaptation Menu Workshop

The College of Menominee Nation, an NE CASC consortium institution, recently partnered with the Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science (NIACS) and the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC) to host the fourth in a series of Tribal Adaptation Menu Workshops that commenced in early 2019 and will continue throughout 2020. These events have been organized to help Tribal natural resource managers identify priorities, challenges, and areas of concern as they create action plans for adaptation and resilience. 

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New Publication: Incorporating Climate Change into Invasive Species Management--Insights from Managers

Sunday, November 24, 2019
Emerald Ash Borer

Interactions between invasive species and climate change present new challenges for resource management. Prior to a new study by NE CASC fellow Evelyn Beaury and her collaborators, however, it was unclear what the common concerns, strategies, limitations, and research needs were for managing invasive species in a changing climate.

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