NE CSC at the American Fisheries Society Meeting

Monday, August 18, 2014

A selection of projects funded by the Northeast Climate Science Center will be presented at the American Fisheries Society Meeting on August 18-21, 2014.

 

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One session on Monday, August 18, 2014 will be dedicated to a set of case studies from the NE CSC:
 
Climate Impacts on Fish and Fish Habitats: Case Studies from the Northeast Climate Science Center
Monday, August 18, 2014
Exhibit Hall 400AB (Centre des congrès de Québec // Québec City Convention Centre)

Speakers: Michelle Staudinger, University of Massachusetts Amherst, USGS, Northeast Climate Science Center, Amherst, MA;  Evan Grant, SO Conte Anadromous Fish Laboratory, USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Turners Falls, MA;  Brian Irwin, Georgia Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, U.S. Geological Survey, Athens, GA;  Richard Kraus, USGS Great Lakes Science Center, Sandusky, OH; Craig Paukert/Damon Krueger, Missouri Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; Jana Stewart, Wisconsin Water Science Center, USGS, Middleton, WI 
 
Description: The Department of Interior Northeast Climate Science Center (NE CSC) conducts research that responds to the regional natural resource management community’s needs to anticipate, monitor, and adapt to climate change. We will highlight ongoing work at the NE CSC that seeks to better understand climate impacts on freshwater and coastal fish and fish habitats. We will report from ongoing studies on two tools that 1) integrate multi-agency stream temperature locations and data into a web-based decision support mapper to help resource managers gain an understanding of baseline conditions, historic trends, and future projections, and 2) assess the impacts of anthropogenic stressors such as land use and pollution, with potential future climate changes on stream fishes and habitats as a spatially-explicit, web-based viewer. Two Great Lakes Basin projects will demonstrate how 1) climate change is altering trophic interactions and the sustainability of commercially important fishes, and 2) spatiotemporal variability can provide statistical indicators with implications for forecasting fish population responses to climate forcing. Lastly, Structured Decision Making is being used to frame landscape-scale management decisions, incorporate multiple decision makers, and identify management strategies for northeastern headwater stream ecosystems and trust species that are robust to uncertainties induced by a changing climate.
 

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Several other sessions at the meeting will include speakers that are supported by the NE CSC for their research projects. These sessions include:

Dynamic Hypoxic Zones in Lake Erie Compress Fish Habitat Altering Vulnerability to Fishing Gears (Richard Kraus, USGS Great Lakes Science Center, Sandusky, OH)
Thursday, August 21, 2014: 9:40 AM
202 (Centre des congrès de Québec // Québec City Convention Centre)
 

Using Variance Structure As Statistical Indicators of Large Scale Ecological Change (Tiffany Vidal, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Brian Irwin, Georgia Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, U.S. Geological Survey, Athens, GA)

Thursday, August 21, 2014: 10:30 AM 

2104B (Centre des congrès de Québec // Québec City Convention Centre)


Road-Stream Crossing Failure in an Extreme Flood Event: Mutual Benefits of Appropriate Design for Human Infrastructure and Stream Fish Populations (Keith H. Nislow, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA)
Thursday, August 21, 2014: 2:30 PM 
2103 (Centre des congrès de Québec // Québec City Convention Centre)