Alessandra Bottero

Past NE CSC Fellow
Postdoctoral Associate

Consortium Institution: 

University of Minnesota

Affiliations: 

Department of Forest Resources (University of Minnesota), United States Forest Service (USFS) Northern Research Station

Education: 

Ph.D., 2013, Forest and Environmental Sciences, University of Torino, Italy
M.S., 2009, Forest and Environmental Sciences, University of Torino, Italy
B.S., 2007, Forest and Environmental Sciences, University of Torino, Italy

Website: 

Experience: 

Postdoctoral Research Associate, Forest Dynamics Research Unit, Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL, Switzerland January 2017-present
Visiting Scientist, Forest Dynamics Research Unit, Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL, Switzerland, April-December 2016
Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Minnesota, March 2014-December 2015
Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Agricultural, Forest and Food Sciences, University of Torino, Italy, February 2013-February 2014
Visiting Scientist, Forest Ecology, ETH Zürich, Switzerland, September-October 2013,
Graduate Teaching Assistant, Department of Agricultural, Forest and Food Sciences, University of Torino, Italy, July-December 2012,
Visiting Scholar, Department of Geography, University of Colorado Boulder, April-November 2011, September-October 2012,
Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Agronomy, Silviculture and Land Management, University of Torino, Italy, June-November 2009

Research Interests: 

I am a forest ecologist interested in the influence and interaction of climate change, disturbances, and management on forest ecosystems. Climate change, and the increasing drought frequency and intensity, represent great challenges for resource managers. The assessment of how long-term forest density management reduces drought vulnerability of forest ecosystems is lacking, but necessary to develop strategies that sustain forest ecosystem functioning by enhancing resistance and resilience to environmental stress. My current research uses dendroecology to examine growth responses during known droughts occurring over the past 60-70 years in several long-term experimental forests across the USA.